Frontiers

Frontiers in Public Health Services and Systems Research is an open-access, rapid-response, peer-reviewed online journal offering brief, preliminary PHSSR findings from ongoing or recently completed empirical studies or quality improvement projects. Journal articles answer questions of importance regarding the organization, financing, and delivery of public health services; the structure, operation, and management of public health delivery systems; the application of quality improvement methods in public health settings; and/or the impact of these endeavors on population health. Findings must have the potential to guide future public health practice, health policy, and research. Frontiers is intended to provide quick access to actionable public health infrastructure research to improve public health practice at the state and local levels. It is of use to practitioners, policy makers and researchers.

November 1, 2014
Michael A. Preston PhD, MPH et al.

As health reform gains momentum, many changes have been seen in the way health services are delivered and financed. In an attempt to address the uncertainties and understand the costs of delivering STD prevention services, the authors examined the cost of STDs in a highly centralized public health agency system (PHAS). This commentary covers several implications that arise from this study.

November 1, 2014
William C. Livingood et al.

Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) continue to be a major health problem in the U.S. Despite the persistence of STDs and the critical role of the public health sector in controlling these diseases, STD services continue to be reduced. A linear regression was performed using county demographic and cost variables. Many of these variables in county public health agencies and the populations they serve were not significantly correlated with cost of service.

October 31, 2014
Gregory A. Aarons et al.

There is a growing impetus to effectively implement evidence-based practices (EBPs) in health and allied health settings in order to improve the public health impact of such practices. To support implementation and sustainment of EBPs, it is important to consider that health care is delivered within the outer context of public health systems and the inner context of health care organizations and work groups (3).

October 31, 2014
Christopher M. Maylahn

In 2012, Frontiers published an article by Allen et al. about identifying administrative and management practices that make up an evidence-based local health department.1 They recommended that local health departments (LHDs) consider using such practices to implement sustained evidence-based policies, programs, and interventions. Strategies that should be given ‘high priority’ for implementation were highlighted.

October 31, 2014
Kathleen Duggan et al.

Evidence based public health (EBPH) in local health departments (LHDs) is a process that involves translating the best available scientific evidence into practice. However, EBPH and implementation of evidence based programs and policies in LHDs are not widespread. This report outlines the patterns and predictors of the use of administrative evidence based practices (A-EBPs) in a national sample of LHD directors. LHDs can improve performance, prepare for accreditation and ultimately improve community health by utilizing an administrative evidence based process.

August 23, 2014
Jacqueline MacDonald Gibson et al.

Anecdotal evidence suggests that historically African American communities on the fringes of cities and towns in North Carolina have been systematically denied access to municipal drinking water service. This paper presents the first statistical analysis of the role of race in determining water access in these fringe areas, known as extraterritorial jurisdictions. Using publicly available property tax data, we quantified the percentage of residences with municipal water service in each census block in Wake County (the second-largest by population in North Carolina).

August 23, 2014
Simone Singh et al.

Local health departments (LHDs) across the United States deliver a range of essential public health services, yet little is known about the costs that LHDs incur in providing these services and the factors that may cause costs to vary both within and across health departments. This report first describes the variations in the costs of one core public health activity commonly provided by LHDs: food hygiene services. It then analyzes the factors that drive LHDs' cost of service provision focusing on the role of economies of scale and economies of scope.

August 23, 2014
Gulzar H. Shah Dr.

In view of the critical role local health departments (LHDs) play among agencies responsible for responding to natural and man-made emergencies, Bevc et al. examined the LHDs’ emergency preparedness and capacity. They compared LHDs in North Carolina with those across the country for preparedness along eight domains. Significant declines in emergency preparedness were noted from 2010 to 2012 for five out of eight domains, raising questions about our national priority concerning this important function of public health agencies.

August 22, 2014
Christine A. Bevc et al.

Local health departments (LHDs) are essential to emergency preparedness and response activities. Since 2005, LHD resources for preparedness, including personnel, are declining in the face of continuing gaps and variation in the performance of preparedness activities. The effect of these funding decreases on LHD preparedness performance is not well understood. This study examines the performance of preparedness capacities among NC LHDs and a matched national comparison group of LHDs over three years.

August 22, 2014
Rodrigo S. Reis et al.

There is need for assessing the practices undertaken by local health departments in order to improve the implementation of evidence-based actions. This paper describes the development and testing of a survey instrument for assessing Administrative Evidence-Based Practices (A-EBPs) in Local Health Departments. A-EBPs identified through a review of the literature were used to develop a survey composed of nine sections and tested in a sample of local health department practitioners. The resulting tool showed adequate test-retest reliability and internal consistency.